Retno Wulandari  26 May 2017 16:02

With over 700 ethnic groups live throughout the archipelago for centuries, Indonesia boasts diversity of ethnicities and cultures, one of which is reflected in its traditional dances. Each ethnic group has their own traditional dances — making more than 3,000 Indonesian original dances in total.

Traditional dances in Indonesia are usually classified into two genres, folk dance and court dance —those performed only in the palace in front of kings and royals. However, as the time flies by, court dances started to be performed in public stages.

Here are some popular Indonesian traditional dances we can still see today.

Cakalele (North and Central Maluku)

Cakalele dancer (Photo via Deviantart/ingdjun)

This war dance is performed by men wearing traditional war costumes: two of them play captains or leaders while the rest are the supporting warriors. The dance involves spears (sanokat) and long knife (lopu) as properties, with dancers performing movements that represent war and duels.

Merak (West Java)

Merak dance (Photo via Flickr/MuJa K)

Merak Bodas (Photo via Wacana)

Merak (means peacock) is a new creation from the land of Pasundan (West Java), created by artist Raden Tjetjep Soemantri in 1950s and remade by Irawati Durban in 1965. This dance is usually performed as part of a guest-welcoming ceremony or in a traditional Sundanese wedding ceremony. Dancers wear mostly green and blue peacock costumes. Irawati Durban also recreated the dance and came with White Merak Dance (Tari Merak Bodas) in which dancers are wearing white peacock costumes.

Sanghyang Dedari (Bali)

Sanghyang Dedari (Photo via Aktual)

Sanghyang Dedari is a sacred dance performed in Bona Village, Gianyar, Bali. The dance was thought to be extinct until a research team found that the dance was still performed in the village of Geriana Kauh, North Duda, Karangasem, Bali — the only place that still preserves Sanghyang Dedari on stage.

The dance used to be performed before the rice turn yellow (around April), involving young girls who haven’t yet entered their menstrual phase, in a state of trance, as a tribute to Dewi Sri — the goddess of crops and fertility. 

Sendratari Ramayana (Yogyakarta and Bali)

Sendratari Ramayana (Photo via Flickr Kaka Widiyatmoko)

(Photo via Perahu Merah)

This dance is a show that combines dance and drama without dialogue that tells the legend of Ramayana. Sendratari Ramayana — or Ramayana Ballet — tells the story of Prince Rama's attempt to save his wife Sinta, who was kidnapped by evil giant Ravana. The dance is regularly staged in Prambanan temple compound, Yogyakarta, as well as various Balinese temples in Bali Island. The dance is originated from the Hindu-Buddhist era, adopting scenes in Ramayana or Mahabharata Hindu epic.

Bedhaya (Solo and Yogyakarta)

Solonese Bedhaya (Photo via Anak Rimba)

Yogyakartan Bedhaya dance (Photo via GateofJava)

It’s a Javanese sacred ritual dance of the royal court, only to be staged in the royal palaces of Yogyakarta and Surakarta. There are two kinds of Bedhaya, Bedhaya Ketawang in Solo, Bedhaya Semang in Yogyakarta — which is no longer performed. The Solo version is still performed once a year, on the second day of the Ruwah month in Javanese calendar (during May in Gregorian calendar).

The dance involves nine females, all of them are royal family members, in front of a private audience. Being invited to see the performance with the inner circle of the court is considered an honor. The dance is usually performed in a pendhapa —audience hall with pillars and peaked roof.

Legong (Bali)

Legong dancer (Photo via Shutterstock)

Legong dance performance accompanied by Balinese gamelan (Photo via Shutterstock Andreas H)

Originated in the 18th century as royal entertainment, Legong is characterized by elaborate finger and foot movements, as well as sharp face expression. 

According to Babad Dalem Sukawati, Legong dance was created based on the dream of Sukawati King I Dewa Agung Made Karna. He dreamed of seeing angels dancing in Heaven. They danced in beautiful clothes and wore golden headdresses, and thus he created the Legong dance. It’s originated from the Hindu-Buddhist era.

Gending Sriwijaya (Palembang)

Gending Sriwijaya (Photo via Indonesia Kaya)

Originating in Palembang, South Sumatera, Gending Sriwijaya represents the splendor of the glorious Sriwijayan empire, which once ruled the western part of the Indonesian archipelago, as well as parts of modern-day Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, and Brunei.

The dance involves nine female dancers, wearing Palembang traditional gilded costume called Aesan Gede, which is also worn as a wedding costume. Among the dancers, there’s one prime lady who wears the most elaborate costume and jewelry and acts as a leader. Gending Sriwijaya was once considered a court dance with hints of Hindu-Buddhist elements although the costume is more covering.

Jaipongan (West Java)

Jaipongan Bunga Tanjung (Photo via Wikimedia)

Jaipongan Langit Biru (Photo via Wikimedia)

Jaipongan is a Sundanese signature folk dance created by artist Gugum Gumbira in 1974 based on traditional Sundanese Ketuk Tilu music and Pencak Silat (traditional martial art) movements. The dance belongs to the neo-traditional genre, which was born after President Soekarno prohibited rock and roll and other western genres of entertainments in 1961. There are various kinds of Jaipongan, including Jaipongan Langit Biru and Jaipongan Bunga Tanjung.

Kuda Lumping (Java)

Kuda Lumping (Photo via Top Indonesia Holidays)

Kuda Lumping dance depicts Javanese troops riding horses made of bamboos and decorated with paints and ornaments. Sometimes, the dancers perform in a state of trance and display some extreme abilities such as eating pieces of broken glass or walking through burning charcoals. It’s originated from the prehistoric-tribal era.

Kecak (Bali)

Kecak Dance (Photo via Shutterstock/Alexander Mazurkevich)

(Photo via Shutterstock/Alexander Mazurkevich)

Also known as the Ramayana Monkey Chant, kecak is usually performed by 150 men wearing poleng — Balinese sacred checked cloth — around their waists. They sit in a circle, chanting “cak... cak... cak...” percussively with their hands up in the air. The dance portrays some scenes in Ramayana epic.

Barong Dance (Bali)

Barong (right) and Rangda fighting scene (Photo via Shutterstock)

Barong dance opening (Photo via Shutterstock/Vassamon Anansukkasem)

The dance depicts an eternal battle between Barong —a lion-like creature represents the good— against Rangda —a demon queen and mother of all evil creatures in Balinese mythology. In general, Barong dance represents the battle between good and evil.

Saman (Aceh)

Saman dance (Photo via Flickr/mariotapilouw)

Saman is a popular dance originated from Gayo ethnic group from Gayo Lues, Aceh, Sumatera. It’s performed by dancers sitting in line, and characterized by harmonious, speedy movements of arms, head, and upper body shown by dancers. Saman is a heritage of the Islamic era.

 

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Retno Wulandari  19 May 2017 12:00

Most traditional costumes of Indonesian ethnic groups are equipped with a headdress that add a majestic look to the intricately designed outfits. From Aceh to Papua, brides are seen with crowns, paes (Javanese head ornaments), gold jasmine flowers, and other over the top head accessories.

Here are some of them.

Jamang

Jamang Aceh Samudera Pasai (Photo credit: Weddingku/Robby Suharlim)

Jamang or sometimes called Siger is the head jewelry worn on the forehead. It is worn encircling the head resembling a headband, usually adorning the forehead, starting from the top of the forehead to the temple.

Jamang is a complement to various Indonesian traditional costumes, especially in Java, Sunda, Bali, Lampung, Palembang and West Sumatra as it is usually worn to match a wedding dress or traditional dancer’s clothing.

Jamang (Photo via Wikimedia)

Jamang in Aesan Paksangko wedding costume from Palembang (Photo via Vienna Gallery)

Jamang worn by a Balinese dancer (Photo via Shutterstock)

Today, it’s made of brass and adorned with man-made gemstones. But in the past, as worn by royals, jamang was made of gold or silver and adorned with real diamonds and other precious stones.

Gelungan Agung

Gelungan Agung on Balinese Payas Agung wedding outfit (Photo credit: Weddingku/Robby Suharlim)

Gelungan Agung is a crown and head ornaments used by Balinese royals in the past and is now adopted to a Balinese traditional wedding costume, Payas Agung. For the bride, the Gelungan Agung is formed with the arrangement of golden sandat flowers, ornamented with golden crown and srinata (gold symmetrical curvature on the forehead). For the groom, it’s formed with sandat flowers in smaller quantities and equipped with a crown known as  gelung garuda mungkur.

Suntiang

Suntiang Gadang Minang Pesisir (Photo credit: Weddingku/Timur Angin)

Suntiang is a highly-intricate traditional headdress in Minangkabau, West Sumatra. As any other traditional headdress in Indonesia, suntiang also adopted to Minangkabau’s wedding outfits. There are various kinds of suntiang in Minang culture, such as Pisang Saparak (originated from Solok Salayo), Suntiang Pinang Bararak (from Koto Nan Godang Payakumbuh), Suntiang Mangkuto (from Sungayang), Suntiang Kipeh (from Kurai Limo Jorong), Suntiang Sariantan (from Padang Panjang), Suntiang Matua Palambaian and several more. Each and every suntiang has its own uniqueness and cultural values.

Suntiang Pisang Saparak (Photo credit: Yosefina Yustiani)

 

Some suntiang consists of 11 layers of ornaments and the installation process is quite complicated. As seen, suntiang is quite heavy. Brides have to bear a five-to-six kilograms suntiang perched on their heads for hours.

Tengkuluk Tanduak

The bride wearing Tengkuluk Tanduak (Photo via Instagram/@sanggarminangdjusmasri)

Tengkuluk Tanduak in Bundo Kanduang traditional outfit (Photo via Wacana Nusantara)

Tengkuluk Tanduak, also known as Tikuluak Tanduak, is a typical women’s headdress made of balapak cloth, mainly seen in Lintau Buo region of Minangkabau, West Sumatra. The headdress is shaped like a double-pointed horn, decorated with gold ornaments. The symbolic meaning of this fixture is the possession of rumah gadang, Minang traditional house. That is, the person wearing it is a bundo kanduang, the owner of a rumah gadang.

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Sundanese Siger

Sunda Siger (Photo via Instagram/@agustinanggri)

Siger is a crown by Sundanese queens and princesses in the past and has been adopted as a part of today’ Sundanese bridal and dance costume. The headdress represents wisdom and honor as prominent qualities within oneself to be upheld. The crown is often accompanied by kembang goyang, seven flower-shaped ornaments —five front-facing and two rear-facing— symbolizing inner and outer beauty.

Palembang Siger

Palembang Siger Aesan Gede (Photo credit: Weddingku/Krishna)

Palembang siger is a complement for Aesan Gede, Palembang traditional outfit worn by royals during the Great Kingdom of Sriwijaya era. The outfit — now adopted as Palembang wedding costume — symbolizes the wealth of Sriwijaya, with red songket cloth and golden embroidery all over it.

Sigokh

Lampung Siger Pepadun (left) and Saibatin (right) (Photo credit: Gede Setiyana)

Sigokh or Lampung Siger is an icon which represent Lampung in general. In the past, siger used to be a headdress for queens, but today it has been adopted as a complement for Lampung’s traditional wedding outfit. There are three variants of siger, according to their origins. Siger Saibatin that comes from coastal regions in Lampung province, which mainly inhabited by Saibatin ethnic group; Siger Pepadun that comes from the mountainous regions in the province, where Pepadun ethnic group lives; and the last one, Siger Tuha, an ancient crown originated from Hindu-Buddhist era in Lampung.

 

 

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Retno Wulandari  17 May 2017 12:15

We've heard about batik, but batik is not the only fabric Indonesia has. With hundreds of ethnic groups, Indonesia has thousands of colorful traditional fabrics — all are equally beautiful and unique, each with its own meaning and values. 

Here are some of Indonesia's most popular fabrics.

Batik

One of Batik Pesisir patterns (Photo via Shutterstock)

Batik is Indonesia's most prominent traditional textiles, originating from the island of Java. Traditionally, batik is made of natural materials, such as cotton and silk, or a mixture of both, using natural dye and wax that created the fabric's beautiful and calm natural colors. Batik is made by applying hot wax onto white plain cloth, forming desired patterns and then dyeing it with colors. The cloth is then washed and boiled in water several times before it can be used.

One of Batik Pedalaman/Kraton patterns (Photo via Shutterstock)

Javanese batik is divided into two types: batik pedalaman (or Kraton batik) and batik pesisir (coastal batik). Batik pedalaman, also known as classical batik, came from Javanese royal tradition, especially in Yogyakarta and Surakarta (Solo). It was originally made for royals and aristocrats and has many traditional values and meanings. Batik pedalaman usually has geometrical patterns and comes in calm, dark colors, such as deep brown, light brown or deep blue.

Batik in Javanese wedding costume "Paes Ageng" (Photo via Shutterstock)

On the contrary, batik pesisiran, thanks to its Chinese, Indian and Arabian influence, is brighter in colors and more dynamic in patterns. More vivid colors often seen, such as red, green, fuchsia, blue and yellow. Patterns like flowers, bird of paradise, or butterflies also often seen in batik pesisiran.

Sasirangan

Sasirangan (Photo via Wikimedia)

Sasirangan is a custom fabric of Banjar tribe in South Kalimantan. Its patterns and colors are obtained from the process of staining with a barrier, using rope or yarn to form certain patterns. Compared to the tie dye fabric in general, sasirangan patterns are typically more orderly and smaller, creating the impression of grace and elegance.

Ulos

One of ulos patterns (Photo via Shutterstock)

Ulos is a traditional textile of Batak tribes of North Sumatra that is traditionally worn during weddings, funerals or other formal events. ulos is normally worn as a drape over the shoulder. There are many kinds of ulos for different ceremonial necessities, but in general, ulos is generally hand-woven, made using manual loom machine. In weddings, the bride and groom are bound together with one piece of ulos. In Batak culture, giving ulos (mangulosi) to friends and relatives is an expression of love and homage to the receiver.

Batak bride and groom wearing ulos (Photo via Kapanlagi)

Gringsing

Gringsing (Photo via Mukenabalietnik)

Gringsing is a traditional fabric from Tenangan, Bali. Making one piece of gringsing takes a very long time, about two to five years, as the process is mostly done by hands, with minimum tool involved. Gringsing name was derived from two words, gring which means “sick” and sing which means “no/negative”. The fabric is believed to be the disease repellent.

Songket

Palembang songket (Photo via BucukotaPalembang)

Songket is a traditional Malay woven fabric. It can be found in Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei. The hand woven fabric is usually made of silk or cotton and considered exquisite, luxurious and prestigious traditional fabric to be worn only during ceremonies, weddings, and formal occasions. In Indonesia, songket can be found mainly in Palembang (South Sumatra), Minangkabau (West Sumatra), Medan (South Sumatra), Jambi, Lombok and Bali.

Komering bride wearing songket (Photo credit: Mahligai/Ridha Kusumabrata)

Lahat bride and groom wearing songket (Photo credit: Mahligai/Seno-Photomotion)

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Besurek

Besurek (Photo via Bengkulu Express)

Besurek (means “written”) comes from Sumatran province of Bengkulu. It is a batik-like fabric but most of its patterns resemble Arabic scripts or calligraphy. The patterns are influenced by the elements of Islam. The making of besurek is not much different from batik, but it has brighter and bolder colors.

Tapis

Tapis (Photo via Wikimedia)

Tapis is a traditional woven fabric from Lampung. It is usually made in dark color, mostly black, deep red or deep green. It’s embellished with warped and couched gold threads that form the typical tapis patterns. Tapis can also be decorated with beads or small coins. Tapis is usually used during formal ceremonies and special occasions. In addition to part of wedding costume, Tapis can also be used as wall decoration. It comes with floral, geometric, or Arabic script patterns.

Women wearing tapis as sarong and sash (Photo via SanggarNusantara)

Lurik

Lurik (Photo via BlogGunungKidul)

Lurik is a woven cloth with stripes that has traditionally been a typical rural male outfit among Javanese tribes. Made of rough cotton, the fabric is relatively cheap and affordable for the poor in the past. Now lurik has transformed into a modern cloth that is often used in modern fashion and has been made in more colors.

Lurik in modern fashion (Photo via Kapanlagi)

Ikat

Tenun ikat Lombok (Photo via Wikimedia)

Ikat is woven from strings of yarn. Prior weaving process, strands of yarn are tied with plastic or rope in accordance with the pattern to be made, so that when dyed, the yarn won’t be stained with the dye.The looms used are non-electrical looms. Some areas in Indonesia famous for their ikat woven cloth are Toraja, Sintang, Jepara, Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Sumba, Flores and Timor.

Sutra Bugis

Sutra Bugis sarong matched with Baju Bodo (Photo via Masagena)

Sutra Bugis, or Bugis silk sarongs, was originally only used to pair with baju bodo (traditional clothes of South Sulawesi). Bugis silk sarongs have different checkered patterns that used to give a clue whether a Bugis is married. The smaller checkered pattern in bright colors is called the Ballo Renni and it is made for unmarried women. While the bigger checkered pattern in bright redcalled Balo Lobang is made for unmarried men. In addition to these two patterns, there are also some other patterns in Bugis silk sarongs.

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Retno Wulandari  03 May 2017 11:15

What do you think about the possibility of meeting a giant in the forest? No, it’s not a Lord of The Rings thing. A Danish artist has made it real, as he created 25 big sculptures using recycled materials and placed them all around the world, with 6 of them hidden in the forests of his hometown in Copenhagen.

Thomas Dambo spent his last three years collecting 600 old pallets, tearing down old wooden shed, shabby fences and other materials he could scavenge to build giant structures depicting various characters of human-like giants. He had some help from local volunteers to build the sculptures and he named each sculpture after one volunteer.

He also created a treasure hunt game for those who want to see his artworks in Copenhagen. Each giant was placed in different parts of the city, in off the beaten tracks. They can only be found by tracking down the path with a help of a treasure map, or a poem engraved into a stone near each giant. The poems contain hints to find the next giant.

“I hope my art will inspire people to see the big potential in recycling and taking better care of our planet,” he said.

Meet Little Tilde in the forest.

(Photo credit Thomas Dambo)

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

This one is Thomas who is relaxing on the mountain.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

Here’s Oscar, hiding under a bridge.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

CLICK NEXT TO FIND MORE GIANTS

The beautiful Trine, looking at the horizon from the top of a hill.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

This one is called Louis, a giant who likes to sleep under the shady roof of foliage.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

 

And this is the Friendly Teddy who tends the riverbank.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

You can find them with the hints in each poem.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

Or by tracking down the path in this treasure map.

(Photo credit: Thomas Dambo)

 





 

 

 

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Agustin Wahyuningsih  02 May 2017 14:05

Jupiter Aerobatic Team (JAT) of Indonesian Air Force (AU) is back in action to demonstrate a thrilling visual experience during the 2017 Jogja International Air Show (JIAS) in Depok Beach Runway, Bantul, Yogyakarta on Sunday.

For four consecutive days before the event, the Yogyakarta-based seven-pilot team internationally admired for their death-defying synchronised aerobatic performance has roamed over the city's skies, drawing patterns to captivate thousand eyes of citizen with their South Korean-manufactured KT-1B Wong Bee.

In case you missed them, we've gathered some photos and footages from the JAT's official facebook page and other social media capturing their action before and during the 2017 JIAS, Monday.

Enjoy!

1. Above the Malioboro's sky

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team/Kusri Hatmoyo


2. 0-kilometer point of Yogyakarta

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team


3. Bomb burst maneuver above the Prambanan Temple

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team/Ardian MK


4. Flying above Ratu Boko complex

Photo: Instagram/@berandajogja


5. The final day of 2017 JIAS


6. Mirror maneuver by Jupiter 5 & 6

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team/Ardian MK


7. Screw roll by Jupiter 4 Team

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team/Ardian MK


8. Roaming above Depok Beach

Photo: Instagram/@dannarwhilasto


9. Flying over Keraton Yogyakarta Palace

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team


10. A bridge on the sky

Photo: Facebook/@Jupiter Aerobatic Team


11. A huge 'love' from JAT to Yogyakarta residents

 

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Andry Trysandy Mahany  27 April 2017 11:05

Though he's known as a serious and formidable figure, Indonesian proclamator and first president Soekarno turned out to be humorous and comical.

The former president was often caught doing his playful act with people around him. The following series of old photos will show you what we mean.

 

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Victoria Tunggono  19 April 2017 17:58

Indonesia is known to have a long history of Buddhist and Hindu kingdoms before Islam and Christianity entered the archipelago in the sixteenth century.

Those kingdoms have long gone, but traces of their civilization and sophistication can still be found today.

Candi, or temple, is an ancient heritage building from the time of Hindu or Buddhist kingdoms in the past. These temples could have been a place of worship, a gateway, or a sacred spring. They are no longer in use now and are either burnt, ruined, or decayed. However, some temples in Java and Sumatera survived the centuries and wars that we can still visit them today. Some areas in Bali and Kalimantan also still have ther traces of those temples, though mostly are in form of ruins.

 

We made is a list of the surviving temples that you can visit during your next holidays.

 

 

1. Candi Muara Takus, a fourth century Buddhist temple, is located in Riau Province, Sumatra.

via kidnesia

 

2. Candi Kalibukbuk, a seventh century Buddhist temple, is located in Buleleng district, Bali.

via blogspot

 

3. Candi Sewu, an eighth Century Buddhist temple is located in Klaten, Central Java.

via wikiwand

 

4. Candi Kalasan or Kalibening, an eighth Century Buddhist temple, is located in Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via wikimedia

 

5. Candi Cangkuang, an etighth Century Hindu temple, is located in Garut, West Java.

via jelajahgarut

 

6. Candi Ratu Boko is an eighth century Hindu temple, is located in Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via blogspot

 

7. Candi Mendut, also an eighth century Buddhist temple, is located in Magelang, Central Java.

via flickr

 

8. Candi Sari or also known as Bendah is an eighth century Buddhist temple located in Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via wikimedia

 

9. Candi Gebang is also an eighth century Hindu temple and is located in Sleman, Yogyakarta. 

 via wikimedia

 

10. Candi Muncul or also known as Ngempon is an eighth century Hindu temple that is located in Semarang, Central Java.

via semarangplus

 

11. Candi Badut is an eighth century Hindu temple located in Malang, East Java.

 via wordpress

 

12. The world famous Candi Borobudur is a 9th century Buddhist temple located in Magelang, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

13. Candi Selogriyo, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Magelang, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

14. Candi Sambisari, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via wikimedia

 

15. Candi Plaosan, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Klaten, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

16. Candi Ngawen, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Magelang, Central Java.

via destinasian

 

17. Candi Pawon, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Magelang, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

18. Goa Gajah, 9th Century Buddhist Cave. Gianyar, Bali.

via kupubarongubud

 

19. Candi Semar at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

20. Candi Puntadewa at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via flickr

 

21. Candi Arjuna at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via misteraladin

 

22. Candi Bima at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via blogspot

 

23. Candi Srikandi at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via wikimedia

 

24. Candi Sembadra at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via wordpress

 

25. Candi Dwarawati at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via blogspot

 

26. Candi Gatotkaca at Dieng Complex, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Dieng Plateau, Central Java.

via budparbanjarnegara

 

27. Candi Prambanan/Roro Jonggrang, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via ksmtour

 

28. Candi Asu, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Magelang, Central Java.

via blogspot

 

29. Candi Gedong Songo, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Semarang, Central Java.

via way2east

 

30. Candi Banyunibo, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via wikimedia

 

31. Candi Pringapus, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Temanggung, Central Java.

via indonesia-heritage

 

32. Candi Dukuh, 9th Century Hindu Temple. Semarang, Central Java.

via wordpress

 

33. Candi Sojiwan, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Klaten, Central Java.

via dinustech

 

34. Candi Lumbung, 9th Century Buddhist Temple. Klaten, Central Java.

 via kbob

 

35. Candi Barong, 9th-10th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via telusuriindonesia

 

36. Candi Merak, 9th-10th Century Hindu Temple. Klaten, Central Java.

via dinustech

 

37. Candi Morangan, 9th-10th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via wisatapriangan

 

38. Candi Klero/Tengaran, 9th-10th Century Hindu Temple. Semarang, Central Java.

via panoramio

 

39. Candi Ijo, 10th-11th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via 1hal

 

40. Candi Padas/Gunung Kawi, 11th Century Hindu Temple. Gianyar, Bali.

via inbalitravel

 

41. Candi Kedulan, 11th Century Hindu Temple. Sleman, Yogyakarta.

via panoramio

 

42. Candi Gunung Gangsir, 11th Century Hindu Temple. Pasuruan, East Java.

via blogspot

 

43. Candi Bahal I, 11th Century Buddhist Temple. South Tapanuli, North Sumatra.

via wikimedia

 

44. Candi Bahal II/Portibi, 11th Century Buddhist Temple. South Tapanuli, North Sumatra.

via flickr

 

45. Candi Bahal III, 11th Century Buddhist Temple. South Tapanuli, North Sumatra.

via panoramio

 

46. Candi Muaro Jambi, 11th Century Buddhist Temple. Jambi, Sumatra.

via bello

 

47. Candi Belahan/Petirtaan Sumber Tetek, 11th Century Hindu Springs. Mojokerto, East Java.

via wordpress

 

48. Candi Jolotundo, 11th Century Hindu Spring. Mojokerto, East Java.

via panoramio

 

49. Candi Angka Tahun at Candi Penataran/Palah Complex, 13th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

 via blogspot

 

50. Candi Naga at Candi Penataran/Palah Complex, 13th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

via panoramio

 

51. Candi Penataran/Palah Main Temple, 13th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

via photobucket

 

52. Candi Kidal, 13th Century Hindu Temple. Malang, East Java.

via blogspot

 

53. Candi Jago, 13th Century Buddhist Temple. Malang, East Java.

via flickr

 

54. Candi Jawi, 13th Century Hindu-Buddhist Temple. Pasuruan, East Java.

via pasuruan-travel

 

55. Candi Tikus at Trowulan Complex, 13th-14th Century Hindu Temple. Mojokerto, East Java.

via blogspot

 

56. Candi Bangkal, 13th-14th Century Hindu Temple. Mojokerto, East Java.

via wordpress

 

57. Candi Kotes, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

 via panoramio


58. Gapura Wringin Lawang at Trowulan Complex, 14th Century Hindu Gateway. Mojokerto, East Java.

via wacana

 

59. Candi Singosari, 14th Century Hindu-Buddhist Temple. Malang, East Java.

via wisatamalang

 

60. Candi Jabung, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Probolinggo, East Java.

via panoramio

 

61. Candi Sawentar, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

via blogspot

 

62. Candi Surawana, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Kediri, East Java.

via blogspot

 

63. Candi Kalicilik, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

via blogspot

 

64. Candi Rimbi, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Jombang, East Java.

via wordpress

 

65. Gapura Bajang Ratu at Trowulan Complex, 14th Century Hindu Gateway Temple. Mojokerto, East Java.

via youtube

 

66. Candi Kedaton Tiris, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Probolinggo, East Java.

via wikimedia

 

67. Candi Plumbangan, 14th Century Hindu Temple. Blitar, East Java.

via wikimedia

 

68. Candi Pari, a 14th century Hindu temple, is located in Sidoarjo, East Java.

via blogspot

 

69. Candi Sumur, a 14th century Hindu temple, is located in Sidoarjo, East Java.

via blogspot

 

70. Candi Rambut Monte, a 14th century Hindu temple, is located in Blitar, East Java.

via panoramio

 

71. Candi Kendalisada, a 14th-15th century Hindu temple, is located in  Mojokerto, East Java.

via budayapanji

 

72. Candi Dermo, a 14th century Hindu temple, can be found in Sidoarjo, East Java.

via wisatasidoarjo

 

73. Candi Mirigambar, a 14th century Hindu temple, can be found in Tulungagung, East Java.

via tulungagungtourism

 

74. Gapura Jedong is 14th century Hindu gateway you can find in Mojokerto, East Java.

via blogspot

 

75. Candi Sumberawan, a 14th-15th century Buddhist temple is located in Malang, East Java.

via panoramio

 

76. Candi Dadi, a 14th-15th century Hindu temple is located in Tulungagung, East Java.

via wikimedia

 

77. Candi Tegawangi, a 15th Century Hindu Temple, that you can find in Kediri, East Java.

via wisatatulungagung

 

78. Candi Wringin Branjang is a simple 15th century Hindu temple located in Blitar, East Java.

via blogspot

 

79. Candi Cethoa 15th century Hindu temple you can find in Karanganyar, Central Java.

via kliping

 

80. Candi Kethek, 15th Century Hindu temple located in Karanganyar, Central Java.

via wordpress

81. Candi Sukuh is a 15th century Hindu Temple. Karanganyar, Central Java.

via citytourindonesia

 

82. Candi Ngetos is a 15th century Hindu temple located in Nganjuk, East Java.

via hipwee

 

83. Candi Brahu is a 15th century Hindu temple that you can find in Mojokerto, East Java.

via panoramio

 

84. Candi Sanggrahan or Cungkup is located in Tulungagung, East Java, but nobody knows the exact century it was built.

via blogspot

 

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